Blog

Digital X-Rays: Fast, Safe, Modern

In the old days, dental x-rays required longer exposure times, higher radiation, and film processing. At Denise Dental Studio, we use state-of-the-art digital x-rays with short exposure times, low radiation, and no need for film. There are many advantages to the patient. First, the total amount of radiation used when taking dental x-rays is a fraction of that used for conventional dental x-rays. Next, the images are available almost instantly, which saves the patient time in the dental chair. Finally, the x-rays are digital and stored on our office computer for easy retrieval. They can be viewed at any time from a computer—no special light box is required—and they can be easily e-mailed to other dentists who are part of the patient’s treatment team. Another benefit of digital x-rays is that there are environmentally friendly because there is no need for the chemicals that were previously used to develop film.

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Bleeding Gums:

Bleeding Gums are Not Normal Do your gums bleed when you brush or floss your teeth? Some people think that if their gums bleed just a little when they brush or floss, then that might be normal or no cause for concern. The fact is that bleeding gums are never normal. They are a sign of inflammation caused by bacteria. Regular brushing and flossing are essential to control periodontal (gum) disease, but gums that bleed are a warning sign that should not be ignored. If your gums bleed for any reason, contact our office to schedule an appointment. Dr. Denise will advise you of your options and develop a customized treatment plan. Good oral hygiene prevents bleeding gums by cleaning away bacteria that are responsible for red and puffy gum tissue. In our office, we recommend regular visits with our dental hygienists as well as home care techniques that we

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Denise Dental Donated Mouthguards

Dr. Denise has decided to protect as many children’s teeth in the area through a Donated program.  This program is directed to our local community sports teams.  The blog will be updated as the mouth guards are made.  Call the office to enter the program today.   Here is Jake wearing his new guard:                     And JT:                   Here is Noah Meaux: And Adam Granata:                 And Many More:  

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Sealants

What are dental sealants, who should have them, and how long do they last? Sealants are a thin, plastic coating that are painted on the chewing surfaces of teeth — usually the back teeth (the premolars, and molars) — to prevent tooth decay. The painted on liquid sealant quickly bonds into the depressions and groves of the teeth forming a protective shield over the enamel of each tooth. Typically, children should get sealants on their permanent molars and premolars as soon as these teeth come in.  In this way, the dental sealants can protect the teeth through the cavity-prone years of ages 6 to 14. However, adults without decay or fillings in their molars can also benefit from sealants. Sealants can protect the teeth from decay for up to 10 years, but they need to be checked for chipping or wearing at regular dental check-ups.

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Infection Control in Your Dental Office, Annapolis MD

With rising media concerns about infection control practices in Dental offices, it seems an appropriate time to address this issue in our blog: “Infection control procedures are precautions taken in health care settings to prevent the spread of disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has developed special recommendations for use in dental offices. Your dentist cares about your safety and works hard to prevent the spread of infection. Before you enter the examining room, all surfaces, such as the dental chair, dental light, drawer handles and countertops, have been cleaned and decontaminated (disinfected.) Additionally, our office covers these equipment with protective covers, which are replaced after each patient. Non-disposable items like the dental tools are cleaned and sterilized between patients, in an autoclave. Disposable items like needles or gauze are placed in special bags or containers. Infection control precautions also require all dental staff involved in patient care

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Dental Crowns

  A dental crown is a tooth-shaped “cap” that is placed over a tooth to repair a broken or badly damaged tooth.  A crown restores a tooth’s shape, size, and strength.  A dental crown differs from a dental veneer in that it covers more tooth structure because the tooth is more badly damaged, often by decay.  Dental crowns can be made from a variety of materials, including metal, porcelain covered metal, or all-porcelain.   The procedure for installing a dental crown requires two dental office visits.  During the first visit, the damaged tooth is prepared to receive the crown.  If a large area of the tooth is missing due to decay, the tooth will be built up to support the crown.  After the preparation, dental impressions will be made to send to a dental lab, where the permanent crown will be manufactured.  A temporary crown will be fabricated to cover and

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Bruxism

Teeth Grinding Do you wake up in the morning with a dull, constant headache or a sore jaw? Or worse, do you wake up in the morning on the couch after being booted out of the bedroom by your partner who can no longer stand the annoying grinding noise? If you answer yes to these questions, you may suffer from nighttime teeth grinding or “Bruxism”. Teeth grinding can cause big problems. Chronic teeth grinding can cause broken teeth, loose teeth, or even loss of teeth. You can wear your teeth down to just stumps. Even more serious, teeth grinding can alter the function of your jaws, cause hearing loss, headaches, muscle soreness and can cause or worsen TMD. TMD is Temporomandibular Disorder. The temporomandibular joint is a sliding hinge joint that connects the lower jaw to the bone of the skull. The joint lies immediately in front of your ear.

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When should my child first see the Orthodontist?

Many parents are confused by the mixed messages they receive regarding the best time to seek orthodontic treatment for their child.  Should they see an orthodontist when their child still has their baby teeth or wait until all the permanent teeth have erupted?  At what age should their child start treatment?  What types of problems need treatment early and which can wait until their child is older?  The answer to these questions is that there is not one best age/time to start treatment because each child presents with their own unique problems and will need a custom treatment plan to fit their needs. Our goal as orthodontists is to provide each patient with the most appropriate treatment at the most appropriate time.  The American Association of Orthodontics recommends that all children have an orthodontic check-up by age 7.  This is because, at this age, a child has reached several key

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Athletic Dental Injuries in Kids

Sporting accidents are a common cause of tooth injury and it is important to ensure the teeth are protected while being active. This means a mouth guard is a must while playing contact and collision sports. The mouth guard, weather professionally made or over-the-counter, shields the teeth as well as helps to concussions. In collisions the lower jaw will often forcibly collide with the upper jaw, sending a shockwave through the skull and can result in a concussion. Other injuries could include breaking teeth, fractures of the jawbone, displacing teeth, and tooth loss. When any of these occur it is vital to see your dentist as soon as possible. When a tooth is broken or fractured it can be very painful if the fracture is close to the pulp (nerve tissue inside the tooth.) It is important to have a dentist evaluate the tooth, checking that it is properly positioned and inspecting for additional damage. Repairing the fracture may be a

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Fluoride and Children’s Health

Fluoride is a naturally occurring element and it has been proven to strengthen tooth enamel. This is especially important for children when their teeth are developing. In the mouth teeth are exposed to acid, causing the teeth to de- mineralize and break down. Saliva helps to buffer the pH and the minerals that are available in your mouth re-mineralize teeth. When fluoride is available, it is incorporated into teeth as they re-mineralized making them 16 times stronger. The teeth are better resistant against future attacks. Community water fluoridation began in 1945 and according to the American Dental Association fluoride is the “single most effective public health measure to prevent tooth decay.” The past 65 years have repeatedly shown that fluoridation is safe and effective for children and adults. The Anne Arundel County public drinking water is fluoridated and is a great source of drinking water. If you drink well water it may or may not have the proper amount of fluoride.

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